• Further Reading

    • Michael G. Fullan, “Staff Development, Innovation, and Institutional Development,” in Bruce Joyce, ed., Changing School Culture Through Staff Development (Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1990), pp. 3-25.
    • Robert L. Canady and Michael D. Rettig, Block Scheduling: A Catalyst for Change in High Schools (Princeton, N.J.: Eye on Education, Inc., 1995).
    • Tom Donahoe, “Finding the Way: Structure, Time, and Culture in School Improvement,” Phi Delta Kappan, December 1993, pp. 298-305.
    • National Commission on Time and Learning, Prisoners of Time (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1994).
    • John I. Goodlad, A Place Called School (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1984).
    • Joseph M. Carroll, “The Copernican Plan: Restructuring the American High School,” Phi Delta Kappan, January 1990, pp. 358-65.
    • Gordon Cawelti, High School Restructuring: A National Study (Arlington, Va.: Educational Research Service, 1994).
    • J. Allen Queen and Kimberly G. Isenhour, The 4X4 Block Schedule (Princeton, N.J.: Eye on Education, Inc., 1998).
    • Canady and Rettig, op. cit.; and Warren J. DiBiase and J. Allen Queen, “Middle School Social Studies on the Block,” Clearing House, vol. 72, 1999, pp. 377-83.
    • Scott Willis, “Are Longer Classes Better?,” ASCD Update, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, Va., March 1993, pp. 2-3.
    • Janet L. Gerking, “Building on Block Schedules,” Science Teacher, vol. 62, 1995, pp. 23-27.
    • Donald G. Hackmann and David L. Waters, “Breaking Away from Tradition: The Farmington High School Restructuring Experience,” NASSP Bulletin, March 1998, pp. 83-92.
    • Sharon A. Skrobarcek et al., “Collaboration for Instructional Improvement: Analyzing the Academic Impact of a Block Scheduling Plan,” NASSP Bulletin, vol. 81, 1997, pp. 104-11.
    • J. Allen Queen, Robert F. Algozzine, and Martin A. Eaddy, “The Road We Traveled: Scheduling in the 4X4 Block,” NASSP Bulletin, vol. 81, 1997, pp. 88-99.
    • Queen and Isenhour, op. cit.
    • David S. Hottenstein, Intensive Scheduling: Restructuring America's Secondary Schools Through Time Management (Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Corwin Press, 1998).
    • Edward H. Seifert and John J. Beck, “Relationships Between Task Time and Learning Gains in Secondary Schools,” Journal of Educational Research, vol. 7, 1994, pp. 5-10.
    • Canady and Rettig, op. cit.
    • Mary Alice Gunter, Thomas Estes, and Jan Schwab, Instruction: A Models Approach (Boston: Allyn & Bacon, 1990).
    • Donald G. Hackmann, “Ten Guidelines for Implementing Block Scheduling,” Educational Leadership, November 1995, pp. 24-27.
    • Thomas L. Shortt and Yvonne V. Thayer, “Block Scheduling Can Enhance School Climate,” Educational Leadership, December/January 1998-99, pp. 76-81.
    • Michael D. Rettig and Robert L. Canady, “All Around the Block: The Benefits and Challenges of a Nontraditional School Schedule,” School Administrator, vol. 53, 1996, pp. 8-14.
    • Thomas L. Shortt and Yvonne Thayer, “What Can We Expect to See in the Next Generation of Block Scheduling?,” NASSP Bulletin, vol. 79, 1995, pp. 53-62.
    • Hackmann, op. cit.
    • Skrobarcek et al., op. cit.; and Queen and Isenhour, op. cit.
    • J. Allen Queen, Jenny Burrell, and Stephanie McManus, The Teaching Process: A Year-Long Guide (Columbus, Ohio: Merrill Education, 2000).
    • Gwen Schroth and Jean Dixon, “The Effects of Block Scheduling on Student Performance,” International Journal of Education Reform, vol. 5, 1996, pp. 472-76.
    • Walter H. Hart, “A Comparison of the Use of Instructional Time in Block Scheduled and Traditionally Scheduled High School Classrooms” (Doctoral dissertation, University of North Carolina, Charlotte, 2000).
    • Toby York, “A Comparative Analysis of Student Achievement in Block and Traditionally Scheduled High Schools” (Doctoral dissertation, University of Houston, 1997).
    • David A. Mutter, Elaine Chase, and Randolph Nichols, “Evaluation of a 4X4 Block Schedule,” ERS Spectrum, Winter 1997, pp. 3-8.
    • Shortt and Thayer, “Block Scheduling.”
    • Hottenstein, op. cit.
    • Martha M. Day, Claire Ivanov, and Stephen Binkley, “Tackling Block Scheduling: How to Make the Most of Longer Classes,” Science Teacher, vol. 63, 1996, pp. 24-28.
    • Schroth and Dixon, op. cit.
    • Julia Anderson, “Alternative Approaches to Organizing the School Day and Year,” School Administrator, March 1994, pp. 8-11.
    • Daniel Cunningham, and Sue Ann Nogle, “Implementing a Semesterized Block Schedule: Six Key Elements,” High School Magazine, vol. 63, 1996, pp. 29-33.
    • David Marshak, Action Research on Block Scheduling (New York: Eye on Education, Inc., 1997).
    • Joseph Murphy, “Strategies for Principals in Instructional Leadership: Focus on Time to Learn,” NASSP Bulletin, March 1992, pp. 19-25.
    • Block Scheduling in North Carolina: Implementation, Teaching, and Impact Issues (Raleigh: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, 1998).
    • Elaine D. Jenkins, “A Comparative Study of Teaching Strategies Reported by North Carolina High School Teachers in Block and Traditional Schedule Schools” (Doctoral dissertation, University of North Carolina, Charlotte, 2000).
    • Ed Corley, “Teacher Perceptions Regarding Block Scheduling: Reactions to Change,” paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwestern Educational Research Association, Chicago, 1997.
    • Don C. Adams and Mary E. Salvaterra, “Structural and Teacher Changes: Necessities for Successful Block Scheduling,” High School Journal, vol. 81, 1997, pp. 98-105.
    • Queen, Algozzine, and Eaddy, op. cit.
    • Joseph Khazzaka, “Comparing the Merits of a Seven-Period School Day to Those of a Four-Period Day,” High School Journal, December 1997/January 1998, pp. 89-97.
    • J. Allen Queen, Robert F. Algozzine, and Martin A. Eaddy, “The Success of 4X4 Block Scheduling in the Social Studies,” Social Studies, November/December 1996, p. 251.
    • J. Allen Queen, Robert F. Algozzine, and Kimberly G. Isenhour, “First-Year Teachers and 4X4 Block Scheduling,” NASSP Bulletin, vol. 83, 1999, pp. 100-103.
    • Adams and Salvaterra, op. cit.; and Michael W. Thorneburg, “Problems and Success of Block Scheduling Implementation as Perceived by High School Principals in Illinois” (Doctoral dissertation, Illinois State University, 1998).
    • Queen, Burrell, and McManus, op. cit.
    • Queen and Isenhour, op. cit.
    • William J. Gordon, Synectics (New York: Harper & Row, 1961).
    • Bruce Joyce, Marsha Weil, and Emily Calhoun, Models of Teaching, 6th ed. (Boston: Allyn & Bacon, 2000).
    • Paul Eggen and Donald P. Kauchak, Strategies for Teachers: Teaching Content and Thinking Skills, 3rd ed. (Boston: Allyn & Bacon, 1996).
Last Modified on June 12, 2020